Feasibility Study

Beginning in early June, our building principals and the Facilities Department were asked to conduct a feasibility study to evaluate how many students they would be able to fit into each of their classrooms. The principals designed model classrooms using DESE’s recommended three feet of space and then removed desks to create six feet of space. They also took into consideration classrooms that have unique layouts that would not be properly represented by the model classroom. Upon further discussion between district leadership, the district’s Reopening Committee and the School Committee and upon the advisement of the Brockton Board of Health, the Brockton Public Schools will be utilizing six feet of space.

To further space out students, the Brockton Public Schools opted to keep open North Middle School, which was scheduled to close temporarily for repairs this year.  

The following table features the results of the feasibility study.

Feasibility Study Results

 *Does not include more than 1,000 kindergarten students who will be placed between now and September 1.
**Due to space limitations, Brockton High School cannot realistically provide adequate physical distancing in every classroom and common area to allow a full in-person return.

Budgetary Constraints

This spring in the absence of a Chapter 70 figure, the Brockton Public Schools eliminated 64 teaching positions via a combination of layoffs and positions that will not be filled following a teacher’s retirement or resignation. While the school district can reasonably fit all our students by reimagining our common areas, we do not presently possess the staff to be able to accommodate the required number of classrooms. As of this writing, we would not be able to bring all of our students back at once with the recommended six feet of space without the staff members we’ve lost.

Transportation Needs

Budget constraints forced the district to reduce the number of school buses from 55 in the previous year to 37 for this year. Based on our projected enrollment and DESE’s transportation guidelines, the district would require an additional 21 buses or 58 buses total for a hybrid learning model. That does not account for the district’s obligation to providing transportation for the city’s private and charter schools.

In a survey initially distributed on June 30, 2020, 10 percent of families who used BPS transportation during the 2019-2020 school year expressed their intentions to drive their child to school or have them carpool with a classmate. Reducing ridership by 10 percent would still create a significant deficit of buses.  

Conclusion

While we’ve been tasked with submitting our plans for an in-person model, at this time we do not feel that such a model would be feasible for the start of the 2020-2021 school year. However, students who are participating in a hybrid learning model would follow the safety protocols and daily routine described under the “In-Person Learning Model.”

This attitude toward a full return is based on our current understanding of COVID-19 and how it is transmitted, which as you know evolves almost daily. The feasibility of a full return is likely to change if health and safety recommendations change. For that reason, we ask every member of our community to prepare for any sudden changes to our reopening plan (see “Remaining Nimble and Preparing for a Rapid Switch”).

 

Reopening Plans - Updated August 14, 2020

 LETTER FROM THE SUPERINTENDENT

LETTER FROM THE SUPERINTENDENT

FEASIBILITY STUDY

FEASIBILITY STUDY

LEARNING MODELS

EXPLANATION OF THE THREE LEARNING MODELS

 GEARING UP FOR REMOTE LEARNING

GEARING UP FOR REMOTE LEARNING

 HEALTH AND SAFETY

HEALTH AND SAFETY

DISTRICT ACADEMIC CALENDAR

DISTRICT ACADEMIC CALENDAR

IMPORTANT  CONTACTS

IMPORTANT CONTACTS

MONITORING AND MAKING CHANGES

MONITORING AND MAKING CHANGES

Plans in PDF Form

REOPENING PLANS IN PDF FORM